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HIVinfo - National Institutes of Health

Details: HIV/AIDS treatment and research information from the US federal government.

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HIV/AIDS: The Basics - National Institutes of Health

Details: Also talk to your health care provider about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). PrEP is an HIV prevention option for people who don’t have HIV but who are at high risk of becoming infected with HIV. PrEP involves taking a specific HIV medicine every day. For more information, read the ClinicalInfo fact sheet on PrEP.

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HIV Treatment: The Basics - National Institutes of Health

Details: The choice of an HIV regimen depends on a person's individual needs. When choosing an HIV regimen, people with HIV and their health care providers consider many factors, including possible side effects of HIV medicines and potential drug interactions.

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HIV and Immunizations - National Institutes of Health

Details: Some people may experience side effects from vaccines, but these are generally minor (for example, soreness at the location of an injection or a mild fever) and go away within a few days. Severe reactions to vaccines are rare. Before getting a vaccine, talk to your health care provider about the benefits of the vaccine and possible side effects.

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HIV Prevention - National Institutes of Health

Details: A health care worker who has a possible exposure to HIV should seek medical attention immediately. When should PEP be started? PEP must be started within 72 hours (3 days) after a possible exposure to HIV. The sooner PEP is started after a possible HIV exposure, the better. According to research, PEP will most likely not prevent HIV infection

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Living with HIV - National Institutes of Health

Details: Good nutrition is about finding and maintaining a healthy eating style. Good nutrition supports overall health and helps maintain the immune system. It also helps people with HIV maintain a healthy weight and absorb HIV medicines. HIV attacks and destroys the immune system, which makes it harder for the body to fight off infections.

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HIV Medicines and Side Effects - National Institutes of Health

Details: Your health care provider can recommend ways to treat or manage the side effect. In some cases, it may be necessary to change HIV medicines because of a side effect. However, do NOT cut down on, skip, or stop taking your HIV medicines unless your health care provider tells you to.

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The Basics of HIV Prevention - National Institutes of Health

Details: Talk to your health care provider about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). PrEP is an HIV prevention option for people who don't have HIV but who are at risk of getting HIV. PrEP involves taking a specific HIV medicine every day to reduce the risk of getting HIV through sex or injection drug use.

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The Stages of HIV Infection - National Institutes of Health

Details: A person may experience significant health benefits if they start ART during this stage. Chronic HIV Infection The second stage of HIV infection is chronic HIV infection (also called asymptomatic HIV infection or clinical latency). During this stage, HIV continues to multiply in the body but at very low levels. People with chronic HIV infection

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HIV Overview - National Institutes of Health

Details: A latent HIV reservoir is a group of immune cells in the body that are infected with HIV but are not actively producing new HIV.. HIV attacks immune system cells in the body and uses the cells’ machinery to make copies of itself. However, some HIV-infected immune cells go into a resting (or latent) state. While in this resting state, the infected cells don’t produce new HIV.

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HIV and Mental Health - National Institutes of Health

Details: Mental health refers to a person's overall emotional, psychological, and social well-being. Mental health affects how people think, feel, and act. Good mental health helps people make healthy choices, reach personal goals, develop healthy relationships, and cope with stress. Poor mental health is not the same as mental illness.

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HIV and Women - National Institutes of Health

Details: Yes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2018, 19% of the new HIV diagnoses in the United States and dependent areas were among women.. The CDC also reports that: Among all women in the United States and dependent areas who received an HIV diagnosis in 2018, 57% were black/African American.

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HIV and Specific Populations - National Institutes of Health

Details: Lack of health insurance to cover the cost of HIV medicines; The ClinicalInfo fact sheet Following an HIV Regimen: Steps to Take Before and After Starting HIV Medicines includes tips on adherence. Some of the tips may be useful to children and adolescents with HIV and their parents or caregivers.

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HIV and Rash - National Institutes of Health

Details: If you are taking HIV medicines, tell your health care provider if you have a rash. In rare cases, a rash caused by an HIV medicine can be a sign of a serious, life-threatening condition. What are serious rash-related conditions? A rash can be a sign of a hypersensitivity reaction. A hypersensitivity reaction is a potentially serious allergic

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HIV and Heart Disease - National Institutes of Health

Details: Health care providers carefully consider potential drug interactions between HIV medicines and any other medicines a person may be taking. Surgery Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is the most common type of surgery to treat heart disease in adults. During CABG, a healthy artery or vein from the body is used to bypass (go around) the

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HIV and Gay and Bisexual Men - National Institutes of Health

Details: In the United States, gay and bisexual men are the population most affected by HIV. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2017, adult and adolescent gay and bisexual men accounted for 70% of the new HIV diagnoses in the United States and dependent areas.

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HIV Prevention - National Institutes of Health

Details: If you think PrEP may be right for you, see a heath care provider. PrEP can be prescribed only by a health care provider. If your health care provider agrees that PrEP may reduce your risk of getting HIV, the next step is an HIV test. You must be HIV negative to start PrEP.

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The HIV Life Cycle - National Institutes of Health

Details: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the use of HIV medicines to treat HIV infection. People on ART take a combination of HIV medicines (called an HIV regimen) every day.HIV medicines protect the immune system by blocking HIV at different stages of the HIV life cycle.

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Living with HIV - National Institutes of Health

Details: Health care providers are an essential part of successful HIV treatment. They prescribe HIV medicines and order tests to monitor their patients' health. People with HIV work with their health care providers to select an HIV regimen that works best for their needs. The following resources can help you find a health care provider:

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HIV and Diabetes - National Institutes of Health

Details: Diabetes is a disease that develops when levels of glucose in the blood (also called blood sugar) are too high. Glucose comes from the breakdown of the foods we eat and is our main source of energy. Over time, diabetes can cause serious health problems, including heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye problems, and nerve damage.

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What is an Opportunistic Infection?

Details: Ask your health care provider about other ways to avoid the germs that can cause OIs. Be careful about what you eat and drink. Food and water can be contaminated with OI-causing germs. To be safe, don’t eat certain foods, including undercooked eggs, unpasteurized dairy products or fruit juices, or raw seed sprouts.

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HIV and High Cholesterol - National Institutes of Health

Details: Health care providers carefully consider potential drug interactions between HIV medicines and any other medicines a person may be taking. This fact sheet is based on information from the following sources: From the Department of Health and Human Services:

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HIV Overview - National Institutes of Health

Details: If you are interested in participating in a vaccine study, you can also contact the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center by calling 866-833-LIFE (5433) or by emailing [email protected] This fact sheet is based on information from the following sources:

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HIV and Hepatotoxicity - National Institutes of Health

Details: However, a person should never stop taking an HIV medicine unless their health care provider tells them to. What is hepatotoxicity? Hepatotoxicity is the medical term for damage to the liver caused by a medicine, chemical, or herbal or dietary supplement. Hepatotoxicity can be a side effect of some HIV medicines.

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HIV Treatment Adherence - National Institutes of Health

Details: During regular medical appointments, health care providers can also recommend resources to help people deal with any issues that may interfere with medication adherence. Why is medication adherence important? Taking HIV medicines every day prevents HIV from multiplying, which reduces the risk that HIV will mutate and produce drug-resistant HIV.

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Resources | HIVINFO - National Institutes of Health

Details: Select Health Professionals to access resources on HIV and AIDS, including treatment and prevention guidelines, available through the NIH, CDC, HHS, and other federal agencies. Federal HIV Resources. Select Federal HIV Resources to access a list that contains a broad range of Federal HIV/AIDS information.

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FDA-Approved HIV Medicines - National Institutes of Health

Details: The following table lists HIV medicines recommended for the treatment of HIV infection in the United States based on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) HIV/AIDS medical practice guidelines. All of these drugs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The HIV medicines are listed according to drug class and

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HIV and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

Details: Talk to your health care provider about getting tested for STDs and ask your sex partner to do the same. To find STD information and testing sites near you, call CDC-INFO at 1-800-232-4636 or visit CDC's GetTested webpage. What is the treatment for STDs?

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Contact us | HIVINFO - National Institutes of Health

Details: Phone 1-800-HIV-0440 (1-800-448-0440) Monday to Friday, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time English- and Spanish-speaking health information specialists from the Office of AIDS Research are available.

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HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets | HIVinfo - National Institutes of Health

Details: Fact sheets about HIV/AIDS treatment information, the prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and HIV treatment side effects. All the fact sheets are written specifically for patients in easy to read language.

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HIV Treatment - National Institutes of Health

Details: Health care providers can recommend resources to help people deal with any issues before they start taking HIV medicines. During a person’s first visit with a health care provider is there time to ask questions? Yes, an initial visit with a health care provider is a good time to ask questions. The following are some questions that people with

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HIV and Drug and Alcohol Use - National Institutes of Health

Details: Drug and alcohol use can lead to risky behaviors that increase the chances of getting HIV or passing it on to others (called HIV transmission).For example, a person using drugs or alcohol may have sex without a condom or share needles when injecting drugs.; Drug and alcohol use can harm the health of a person with HIV.

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HIV Overview - National Institutes of Health

Details: For help with your search, call an ClinicalInfo health information specialist at 1-800-448-0440 or email [email protected] You can also join ResearchMatch, which is a free, secure online tool that makes it easier for the public to become involved in clinical trials.

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HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) - National Institutes of Health

Details: Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis.The TB bacteria can spread from person to person through the air. TB usually affects the lungs, but it can affect any part of the body, including the kidneys, spine, or brain.

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HIV Testing - National Institutes of Health

Details: Your health care provider can give you an HIV test. HIV testing is also available at many hospitals, medical clinics, substance use programs, and community health centers. Use this CDC testing locator to find an HIV testing location near you. You can also buy a home testing kit at a pharmacy or online.

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HIV and Lipodystrophy - National Institutes of Health

Details: Your health care provider may recommend that you switch to another HIV medicine. There are ways to manage lipodystrophy. Making dietary changes and getting regular exercise may help to build muscle and reduce abdominal fat.

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HIV and Kidney Disease - National Institutes of Health

Details: Health care providers carefully consider the risk of kidney damage when recommending specific HIV medicines to include in an HIV regimen. Kidney disease can advance to kidney failure. The treatments for kidney failure are dialysis and a kidney transplant. Both treatments are used to treat kidney failure in people with HIV.

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HIV Treatment - National Institutes of Health

Details: An HIV regimen is a combination of HIV medicines used to treat HIV infection. HIV treatment (also called antiretroviral therapy or ART) begins with choosing an HIV regimen.People on ART take the HIV medicines in their HIV regimens every day. ART helps people with HIV live longer, healthier lives and reduces the risk of HIV transmission.. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved

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HIVINFO - National Institutes of Health

Details: Your health care provider can give you an HIV test. HIV testing is also available at many hospitals, medical clinics, substance use programs, and community health centers. Use this CDC testing locator to find an HIV testing location near you. You can also buy a home testing kit at a pharmacy or online.

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Following an HIV Regimen: Steps to Take Before and After

Details: An essential part of effective HIV treatment is medication adherence. Medication adherence means sticking to an HIV regimen—taking HIV medicines every day and exactly as prescribed.; Before starting an HIV regimen, tell your health care provider if you have any issues that might make it hard for you to follow an HIV regimen.

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HIV Medicines During Pregnancy and Childbirth

Details: Women and their health care providers should discuss whether any changes need to be made to an HIV regimen during pregnancy. Do women with HIV continue to take HIV medicines during childbirth? Yes. A baby is exposed to any HIV in the mother's blood and other fluids while passing through the birth canal.

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Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV

Details: The HIV medicines will also protect the women’s health. How do HIV medicines prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV? HIV medicines prevent HIV from multiplying, which reduces the amount of HIV in the body (called the undetectable viral load is when the level of HIV in the blood is too low to be detected by a viral load test.

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HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials - National Institutes of Health

Details: Participants in clinical trials can receive regular and careful medical care from a research team that includes doctors and other health professionals. Often the medicines and medical care are free of charge. Sometimes people get paid for participating in a clinical trial. For example, they may receive money or a gift card.

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When to Start HIV Medicines - National Institutes of Health

Details: For example, a busy schedule or lack of health insurance can make it hard to take HIV medicines consistently. Health care providers can recommend resources to help people deal with any issues that may interfere with adherence. Read the following ClinicalInfo fact sheets to learn more about medication adherence: HIV Treatment Adherence

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HIV and Older People - National Institutes of Health

Details: Your health care provider may recommend HIV testing if you are over 64 and at risk for HIV. For several reasons, older people are less likely to get tested for HIV: In general, older people are often considered at low risk of getting HIV. For this reason, health care providers may not always think to test older people for HIV.

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HIVINFO - National Institutes of Health

Details: Together with their health care providers, women with HIV make decisions about continuing or changing their HIV medicines after childbirth. After birth, babies born to women with HIV receive HIV medicine to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

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HIV and Hepatitis C - National Institutes of Health

Details: Health care providers prescribe HIV and HCV medicines carefully to avoid drug-drug interactions and closely monitor those taking the medicines for any side effects. What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The abbreviation HCV can stand for either the virus or the infection it causes.

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Drug Resistance - National Institutes of Health

Details: Before starting HIV treatment, tell your health care provider about any issues that can make medication adherence difficult. For example, a busy schedule or lack of health insurance can make it hard to take HIV medicines consistently. Once you start treatment, use a 7-day pill box or other medication aid to stay on track.

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HIV and Lactic Acidosis - National Institutes of Health

Details: Health care providers monitor people taking HIV medicines for side effects, such as lactic acidosis. If an HIV medicine is causing lactic acidosis, the HIV medicine should be stopped immediately. However, stopping an HIV medicine because of lactic acidosis doesn’t mean stopping HIV treatment.

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